Dammit Jim!

erikkwakkel:

Smart bookbindings - a lot of them

This morning I visited the Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, Germany, and it was an overwhelming experience. The library was founded in 1572 by Duke Julius of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and it is a rare example of a 16th-century library that survived fully intact. Walking through the library I encountered a big bronze door. When I opened it I suddenly stood eye to eye with something unexpected: vast bookcases stretching from floor to ceiling filled with thousands of bookbindings from the 15th to 17th centuries.

As you would expect, many have fragments of medieval manuscripts and early printed books pasted in and on them, to provide support (last pic). However, this collection is special for another reason. The duke himself wrote on each book what it contained. To find writing on the back of an early-modern book is not unusual, but the duke was a thorough man and went a little overboard, as you can see. The backs not only contain very long title descriptions, but also numbers. In fact, duke August is rumored to have invented the system where book numbers have a decimal point. If book nr. 23 contains physics, the next book he purchased with the same topic would receive nr. 23.1 - think Library of Congress. These are not just old, but also smart bookbindings, which carry history on their backs.

jumpingjacktrash:

allons-ytobakerstreet:


:

Time lapse images of Earth at night taken from the International Space Station.

god this planet is fucking beautiful

always reblog forever.

Holy crap the last one, you can really see the Great Wall from space!

amazziiingg

Earth is so beautiful omg.

reblog forever.

woah the lightning storm in the second last panel is amazing

Fucking amazing and so pretty :3

let’s just… send this around tumblr one more time.

explore-blog:

Behold Kirobo, the tiny humanoid robot designed to travel in space as a companion to astronauts. Let the outer space humor unfold. 

explore-blog:

Behold Kirobo, the tiny humanoid robot designed to travel in space as a companion to astronauts. Let the outer space humor unfold

run-from-my-past:

askgangsterthor:

katesgotabow:

shieldagentmaller:

orithyea:

prnd:

Keeping this… forever…
Excuse me as I copy this down. :o

keeping for reference



I’ve had one of these since high school. My English teacher was adamant about never using said unless we had to.

omg…this is so…amazing… 

for the people who write and only say “he said”, “she said”, “they said”… ugh

run-from-my-past:

askgangsterthor:

katesgotabow:

shieldagentmaller:

orithyea:

prnd:

Keeping this… forever…

Excuse me as I copy this down. :o

keeping for reference

image

I’ve had one of these since high school. My English teacher was adamant about never using said unless we had to.

omg…this is so…amazing… 

for the people who write and only say “he said”, “she said”, “they said”… ugh

thatfunnyblog:

Funny Stuff you like?

Song by my son, to his three sons. Heart felt and beautiful. It made me cry with pain and love.

Grand Schemer-Dear Sons (by DrGrandSchemer)

My favourite spot. The Pinery beach

My favourite spot. The Pinery beach

explore-blog:


On the clock striking twelve he appeared slightly agitated, but he soon recovered, walked twice or thrice along the coach-house, stopped to bark, staggered, exclaimed “Halloa old girl!” (his favorite expression) and died. He behaved throughout with decent fortitude, equanimity and self-possession.

An amusing letter Charles Dickens wrote on the death of his beloved pet raven, Grip – one of history’s notable literary pets extolled in famous authors’ letters and journals.

explore-blog:

On the clock striking twelve he appeared slightly agitated, but he soon recovered, walked twice or thrice along the coach-house, stopped to bark, staggered, exclaimed “Halloa old girl!” (his favorite expression) and died. He behaved throughout with decent fortitude, equanimity and self-possession.

An amusing letter Charles Dickens wrote on the death of his beloved pet raven, Grip – one of history’s notable literary pets extolled in famous authors’ letters and journals.

1ucasvb:

The familiar trigonometric functions can be geometrically derived from a circle. But what if, instead of the circle, we used a regular polygon? In this animation, we see what the “polygonal sine” looks like for the square and the hexagon. The polygon is such that the inscribed circle has radius 1. (There’s a very neat reason for this.) Since these polygons are not perfectly symmetrical like the circle, the function will depend on the orientation of the polygon. More on this subject and derivations of the functions can be found in this other post
Now you can also listen to what these waves sound like
This technique is general for any polar curve. Here’s a heart’s sine function, for instance

1ucasvb:

The familiar trigonometric functions can be geometrically derived from a circle. But what if, instead of the circle, we used a regular polygon? In this animation, we see what the “polygonal sine” looks like for the square and the hexagon. The polygon is such that the inscribed circle has radius 1. (There’s a very neat reason for this.) Since these polygons are not perfectly symmetrical like the circle, the function will depend on the orientation of the polygon. More on this subject and derivations of the functions can be found in this other post

Now you can also listen to what these waves sound like

This technique is general for any polar curve. Here’s a heart’s sine function, for instance

citizenscreen:

Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven” read by Vincent Price.